• What past winter storms teach us about this storm

    By: Jim Spiewak

    Updated:

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. - City and county leaders said they can learn from past winter weather storms. Each system has new challenges.

    But those in charge of getting prepared said they’re monitoring the weather changes and are ready. Friday morning’s forecast, cloudy with the real possibility of snow and ice.  


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    “I don't like car wrecks and all that stuff that comes with it,” said driver Brittany Vaughn.

    Rain started falling at about 1:30 p.m. on Thursday which if it stays wet and temps drop below freezing, lays the foundation for ice.  

    “Oh god, I got to get home before that. Nobody is more scared of this than I am,” Vaughn added.

    Other drivers like Taurus Rubin, who has to get to work on Friday, are planning ahead. “I'm very concerned because they already can't drive, so imagine driving in the snow. It's going to be a lot more accidents,” said Rubin.  

    But drivers aren’t’ the only ones planning. The city Memphis and Shelby County is too.

    “If we're experiencing what's being predicted, don't get out if you don't have to,” said Dale Lane, the Director of the Shelby County Office of Preparedness.  

    Lane works hand-in-hand with the city which has tons of sand and salt ready to go.  

    A couple years ago, the city added more blades and upped their fleet to 12 snow plow trucks. Lane said the Memorial Day storm, although not winter related, is a teachable moment taken from the last big storm.  

    “Taking some extra precautions, taking some extra time we can get through this the same way, without anyone being hurt,” Lane said.  

    The plow trucks will only come out if we see more than 4 inches of snow accumulation. 

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