Doctor says he felt called to help the people of Tunica County

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FOX13 spoke with Doctor Odilichi Ezanwanne, a preventative medicine doctor who runs the Aaron E. Henry Clinic in Tunica County. Originally from Nigeria, he says he was called to Tunica County to help.

Ezanwanne said as a foreign medical graduate, he had to pick a place and serve the country and state. He interviewed in places like Wisconsin and Montana, but when he got to Mississippi and the Aaron E. Henry Clinic in Tunica County, something spoke to him.

“I can’t say — there is just something intangible when I got here in Tunica,” said Ezanwanne. “I think it goes back to when I was in medical school in Nigeria and I was working in the delta area of Nigeria, and I worked in an area that is pretty much like this.”

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Ezanwanne said part of what pulled him to Tunica is the mission of the Aaron E. Henry Clinic to help the underserved in Tunica County.

“What matters most to me is that sense that you have helped someone or a group of people,” Ezanwanne said. “You want to know that you have made a mark and you have helped people accomplish their goals.”

Ezanwanne said part of what keeps him here is the people, much like in the delta area of his home country.

“So fascinating to me the way people think and the way people act, and I see a lot of similarities between here and there and in the need,” Ezanwanne said.

His first name, Odilichi, translates to “It is left for God to decide,” which he says is how he wound up in Tunica County.

“Faith is a large part of who I am,” he said. “I can’t separate myself from my beliefs and my faith, and believing that everyone has a purpose, and you have to strive to fulfill that purpose; and that always entails helping other people.”