• Baptist Hospital helping women avoid miscarriages through new surgery

    By: Lauren Coleman

    Updated:

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Having a successful birth is something Laura Delony thought she would no longer be able to do. 

    After the birth of her 12-year-old son, she’s struggled to carry a child to full term. 

    She experienced her first miscarriage in October of 2016. 

    “I held on to that little boy until 21 weeks when I went into labor and I gave birth and he passed away shortly after,” Delony said. 

    In October of 2018 she experienced a similar tragedy. 

    “It was an emotional roller-coaster,” Delony said. “You’re never supposed to burry a child and I didn’t even get to have that baby very long. It was hard. It was hard.” 


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    Despite her losses, Delony said she’s determined to have a successful birth. 

    She recently underwent a new procedure now offered at Baptist Hospital. 

    Robotic Cervical Cerclage is a robotic surgery that puts a stitch around the cervix to prevent a miscarriage. 

    “This procedure is suited for people whose cervix opens prematurely and the pregnancy can pass away,” Dr. Sanjeev Kumar with Baptist Hospital said. “By putting the stich on the cervix, there’s increased chances that the cervix will remain closed and that the pregnancy will carry farther and the likelihood of having a mature baby being born increases.” 

    Kumar said before offering the surgery in Memphis, patients would have to travel to Chicago and Dallas. 

    “That’s convenient because it’s better financially and for the entire family,” Kumar explained. “The experience is better because it’s done close to home.” 

    Delony had surgery on Feb. 1 and was back to work that three days later. 

    She said the surgery has given her a new sense of hope. 

    “That God blesses us with another pregnancy and I just pray that this time we make it through the whole thing and we have a healthy baby that we get to take home,” Delony said. 

    Kumar told FOX13 the robotic surgery is less painful than the non-robotic procedure and has a quicker healing process. 

    He said women interested in the surgery should consult their own physician first before undergoing a consultation with Baptist Hospital.

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