Parents voice concerns after school employee exposed to coronavirus patient

WATCH: Parents voice concerns after school employee exposed to coronavirus patient

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The news of a school employee exposed to the coronavirus understandably has many families concerned.

We were at Treadwell Elementary Monday morning as parents came to pick their children up.

FOX13’s Dominique Dillon talked to parents who said they can't believe the virus has hit so close to home.

Content Continues Below

"It's overseas, now it's on the homefront,” said Willie Wilson, a grandparent. “It's a war here within."

One by one, parents pulled their kids out of Treadwell Elementary and Middle School Monday morning after they learned a school employee was exposed to the coronavirus.

"I know this is very serious,” said Latrice Colbert, Treadwell parent. “So, I’m just going to make him a doctor's appointment and get him checked out."

Colbert's son is in the fourth grade.

She and other parents said they were not notified by the school.

"My main concern why no one contact us, sent out an email, call us, but if my son acts up at school they will hurry up and call me,” Colbert said. “But if it is something serious, they won't call us, and this is terrible."

We're told the employee has not showed any signs of illness, but that didn't stop parents from pulling their kids out of school.

"I’m trying to be cautious with my children, myself and my husband washing our hands frequently,” Colbert said. “Every ten to fifteen minutes. "

The Shelby County Health Department confirmed the first case of coronavirus in the county Sunday.

A day later, news that a school employee is quarantined for 14 days after coming in contact with the patient.

Officials said there's a lot of children and staff there as well and when one of their children come home sick, then other people can become sick as well.

The health department said there is not an immediate cause for alarm.

They also said the immediate risk to the general public in Shelby County is thought to be low and there is no expected risk to school age children.