5 things to know about Bill Cosby, his prison sentence, victim Andrea Constand

What You Need To Know: Bill Cosby

NORRISTOWN, PA. — Actor and comedian Bill Cosby was sentenced Tuesday to three to 10 years in state prison for drugging and molesting Andrea Constand, his once-friend, in 2004.

More than 60 women have said publicly that Cosby drugged and assaulted them. Some of the allegations date back to the early 1960s.

>> Read more trending news

Content Continues Below

Here are five things to know about Cosby, Constand and the sentencing:

The sentencing:

Cosby was sentenced by Judge Steven O'Neil. O' Neil ruled Cosby, 81, is a "sexually violent predator," meaning he will have to report regularly to authorities and undergo counseling for the rest of his life. Schools and neighbors will be required to know where he is.

Constand's victim impact statement:

Constand, a former Temple University employee released a victim impact statement ahead of the sentencing.

"I know now that I am one of the lucky ones. But still, when the sexual assault happened, I was a young woman brimming with confidence and looking forward to a future bright with possibilities," the statement said. "Now, almost 15 years later, I'm a middle-aged woman who's been stuck in a holding pattern for most of her adult life, unable to heal fully or to move forward.

"Bill Cosby took my beautiful, healthy young spirit and crushed it. He robbed me of my health and vitality, my open nature, and my trust in myself and others."

Denied bail:

Cosby was denied bail after the sentencing. Cosby was booked into Montgomery County Jail and taken to State Correctional Institution Phoenix, located outside Philadelphia, later that same day.

Camile Cosby’s whereabouts:

The Associated Press reported that Cosby declined the chance to speak before the sentencing. He was smiling and laughing while speaking with his defense team. His wife, Camille, was not in court during the sentencing.

Constand reacts to Cosby's sentence:

Constand was hugged by others in the court, smiling once the punishment was read out.