• Officials investigating Measles exposure in Mississippi

    Updated:

    The Mississippi State Department of Health is investigating measles exposure in Mississippi from an out-of-state traveler.

    The exposure happened at various locations from April 9-11 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

    “We are conducting a thorough investigation of the contacts we know this individual made during that timeframe. Measles is extremely contagious, with a 90 percent chance of infection from exposure if you are not protected,” said MSDH State Health Officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs. “So far we have not identified any cases in Mississippi, but please understand that you may have been exposed without knowing. Those who have not been vaccinated against measles need to take immediate precautions.”

    Subway Restaurant inside the Circle K, 4050 U.S. Highway 11 in Hattiesburg
    2-4 p.m.
    Tuesday, April 9

    Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers, 3509 Hardy Street in Hattiesburg
    10-11 p.m.
    Wednesday, April 10

    According to the Mississippi State Department of Health, 

    "Measles is highly contagious. Measles spreads easily through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. If you are unvaccinated and are exposed to someone with measles, your chance of infection is about 90 percent.

    Measles affects both adults and children. Measles is a serious disease in children, and the risk of complications is highest in children younger than 5 years old. Adults can easily be infected with measles as well, and both adults and children can spread the disease to others before they are aware of any symptoms. About 1 in 4 measles cases require hospitalization, and one or two of every 1,000 measles cases results in death.

    Most Mississippians are well protected against measles. Immunization against measles is required before entering school in Mississippi. More than 99 percent of Mississippi school-age children have received a complete dose of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, which provides excellent protection against measles."


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